Alzheimers Channel
Topics & Medications
Quicklinks
Related Channels

The Link Between Smoking, Diabetes, and Dementia

Preventing or Managing Diabetes
About 17 million people in the United States have diabetes, and stroke and heart disease are both common diabetes complications. According to the American Diabetes Association, two out of three people with diabetes die from heart disease or stroke. As mentioned, stroke is a major risk factor for developing vascular dementia.
 
Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not properly produce or use insulin. Insulin is a hormone needed to convert sugar, starches, and other nutrients into energy. Another 16 million Americans have pre-diabetes, a condition in which blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. Genetics and lifestyle factors, such as obesity and physical inactivity, can lead to diabetes.
 
If you have diabetes, your doctor will decide if you need medicine, such as pills or insulin shots. Your doctor can also help you design a healthy eating and exercise plan.
 
(Click Diabetes Treatment for more information.)
 
Not Smoking
Several recent studies have found that smoking significantly increases the risk of mental decline and dementia. People who smoke have a higher risk of atherosclerosis and other types of blood vessel disease, which may be the underlying causes for the increased dementia risk.
 
Your doctor can recommend programs and medications that may help you quit smoking. At any age, by quitting smoking, you will also reduce your risk of lung disease, heart disease, and a number of cancers (including lung cancer).
5 Tips to Reduce Your Risk of Alzheimer's

Information on Dementia

Terms of Use
Advertise with Us
Contact Us
About eMedTV
Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2006-2017 Clinaero, Inc.
eMedTV serves only as an informational resource. This site does not dispense medical advice or advice of any kind. Site users seeking medical advice about their specific situation should consult with their own physician. Click Terms of Use for more information.