Alzheimers Channel
Topics & Medications
Quicklinks
Related Channels

Dealing With Hallucinations, Delusions, and Wandering

Caregiving for Alzheimer's Patients: Hallucinations and Delusions

As the disease progresses, a person with Alzheimer's disease may experience hallucinations and/or delusions. Hallucinations are when the person sees, hears, smells, tastes, or feels something that is not there. Delusions are false beliefs that the person cannot be dissuaded of. Tips for caregivers include:
 
  • Sometimes hallucinations and delusions are a sign of a physical illness. Keep track of what the person is experiencing and discuss it with the doctor.
 
  • Avoid arguing with the person about what he or she sees or hears. Try to respond to the feelings he or she is expressing and provide reassurance and comfort.
 
  • Try to distract the person to another topic or activity. Sometimes moving to another room or going outside for a walk may help.
 
  • Turn off the television set when violent or disturbing programs are on. The person with Alzheimer's disease may not be able to distinguish television programming from reality.
 
  • Make sure the person is safe and does not have access to anything he or she could use to harm anyone.
 

Caregiving for Alzheimer's Patients: Wandering

Keeping the person safe is one of the most important aspects of caregiving. Some people with AD have a tendency to wander away from their home or their caregiver. Knowing what to do to limit wandering can protect a person from becoming lost. Tips for caregivers include:
 
  • Make sure that the person carries some kind of identification or wears a medical bracelet. If he or she gets lost and is unable to communicate adequately, this will alert others to his or her identity and medical condition.
 
  • Keep a recent photograph or videotape of the person with Alzheimer's disease to assist police if the person becomes lost.
 
  • Keep doors locked. Consider a keyed deadbolt or an additional lock up high or down low on the door. If the person can open a lock because it is familiar, a new latch or lock may help.
 
  • Be sure to secure or put away anything that could cause danger, both inside and outside the house.  

 

5 Tips to Reduce Your Risk of Alzheimer's
Terms of Use
Advertise with Us
Contact Us
About eMedTV
Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2006-2017 Clinaero, Inc.
eMedTV serves only as an informational resource. This site does not dispense medical advice or advice of any kind. Site users seeking medical advice about their specific situation should consult with their own physician. Click Terms of Use for more information.