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Alzheimer's Safety Tips for Other Rooms in Your House

Living Room

Changes that may need to be made in the living room include:
 
  • Clear all walk areas of electrical cords.
 
  • Remove scatter rugs or throw rugs. Repair or replace torn carpet.
 
  • Place decals at eye level on sliding glass doors, picture windows, or furniture with large glass panels to identify the glass pane.
 
  • Do not leave the person with Alzheimer's disease alone with an open fire in the fireplace, or consider alternative heating sources. Remove matches and cigarette lighters.
 
  • Keep the controls for cable or satellite TV, VCR, and stereo system out of sight.
 

Laundry Room

Changes that may need to be made in the laundry room include:
 
  • Keep the door to the laundry room locked if possible.
 
  • Lock all laundry products in a cabinet.
 
  • Remove large knobs from the washer and dryer if the person with Alzheimer's disease tampers with machinery.
 
  • Close and latch the doors and lids to the washer and dryer to prevent objects from being placed in the machines.
 

Garage/Shed/Basement

Changes that may need to be made in the garage, shed, or basement include:
 
  • Lock access to all garages, sheds, and basements if possible.
 
  • Inside a garage or shed, keep all potentially dangerous items -- such as tools, tackle, machines, and sporting equipment -- either locked away in cabinets or in appropriate boxes/cases.
 
  • Secure and lock all motor vehicles and keep them out of sight if possible. Consider covering those vehicles, including bikes, which are not frequently used. This may reduce the affected person's thoughts of leaving.
 
  • Keep all toxic materials, such as paint, fertilizers, gasoline, or cleaning supplies, out of view. Put them either in a high, dry place, or lock them in a cabinet.
 
  • If a person with Alzheimer's disease is permitted in a garage, shed, or basement (preferably with supervision), make sure the area is well lit and that stairs have a handrail and are safe to walk up and down. Keep walkways clear of debris and clutter, and place overhanging items out of reach.
 
5 Tips to Reduce Your Risk of Alzheimer's
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